Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Oh, We've Got Change!

Tonight, President Barack Hussein Obama, our first (but not last) African-American president, addressed a Joint Session of Congress. That means The House of Representatives, The Senate, and the Justices of The Supreme Court.



The entire government of The United States of America.

Our President, our Commander in Chief, the man addressing this amazing assembly is the child of a white American, Christian woman from the heart of Kansas and an African, Muslim father from Kenya. He was born in Hawaii and attended school in Indonesia.



After his speech, the Republican...let me repeat that...the REPUBLICAN response, was given by Piyush "Bobby" Jindal, the Governor of Louisiana and at 36, the youngest Governor in the country. His parents were Punjabi Indian immigrants. Jindal was born and raised a Hindu, but converted to Catholicism in high school.



Barack Hussein Obama and Piyush Jindal.

Get used to it, Bubba. This ain't your daddy's America anymore.

It's new and improved! With more color, more diversity, fresh ideas and yes, hope.

I've never been more optimistic about the future of America.

9 comments:

dangerousdaisy said...

Like you crawled in my head and stole my thoughts. (About politics and not religion, that is.)

Liberal-am-I could stand to listen to Jindal for a bit. Then I'll decide.

At least the GOP is wising up and trying to play on a more competent ball field.

Five months ago it was Palin. Two months ago it was Rush.

Yeah, I can give Jindal a listen to.

Xavier Onassis said...

DD - To quote The Wolf from Pulp Fiction, "Well, let's not start sucking each other's dicks quite yet."

"As others noted during his 2003 and 2007 gubernatorial campaigns (see update), in an essay Jindal wrote in 1994 for the New Oxford Review, a serious right-wing Catholic journal, Jindal narrated a bizarre story of a personal encounter with a demon, in which he participated in an exorcism with a group of college friends. And not only did they cast out the supernatural spirit that had possessed his friend, Jindal wrote that he believes that their ritual may well have cured her cancer."

"In the essay (purchase required), Jindal describes an emotional friendship with a classmate, "Susan," recently diagnosed with skin cancer and reeling after the suicide of a close friend. Susan's behavior becomes stranger, and she is surrounded by "sulfuric" smells. Finally, one night at a prayer meeting, she collapses in a seizure -- and the exorcism begins:

The students, led by Susan's sister and Louise, a member of a charismatic church, engaged in loud and desperate prayers while holding Susan with one hand. Kneeling on the ground, my friends were chanting, "Satan, I command you to leave this woman." Others exhorted all "demons to leave in the name of Christ." It is no exaggeration to note the tears and sweat among those assembled. Susan lashed out at the assembled students with verbal assaults.

In the essay (purchase required), Jindal describes an emotional friendship with a classmate, "Susan," recently diagnosed with skin cancer and reeling after the suicide of a close friend. Susan's behavior becomes stranger, and she is surrounded by "sulfuric" smells. Finally, one night at a prayer meeting, she collapses in a seizure -- and the exorcism begins:

The students, led by Susan's sister and Louise, a member of a charismatic church, engaged in loud and desperate prayers while holding Susan with one hand. Kneeling on the ground, my friends were chanting, "Satan, I command you to leave this woman." Others exhorted all "demons to leave in the name of Christ." It is no exaggeration to note the tears and sweat among those assembled. Susan lashed out at the assembled students with verbal assaults.
Jindal then describes how the whole situation made him physically uncomfortable, and he wondered if the same demon afflicting Susan was responsible for his state of nervousness:

Whenever I concentrated long enough to begin prayer, I felt some type of physical force distracting me. It was as if something was pushing down on my chest, making it very hard for me to breathe. . . Though I could find no cause for my chest pains, I was very scared of what was happening to me and Susan. I began to think that the demon would only attack me if I tried to pray or fight back; thus, I resigned myself to leaving it alone in an attempt to find peace for myself.
After a lull in the event -- it in fact lasted "a few hours" by Jindal's reckoning -- Susan attempted to run away, but was dutifully pinned back on the floor by her friends:

Maybe she sensed our weariness; whether by plan or coincidence, Susan chose the perfect opportunity to attempt an escape. She suddenly leapt up and ran for the door, despite the many hands holding her down. This burst of action served to revive the tired group of students and they soon had her restrained once again, this time half kneeling and half standing.
After what sounds like a number of hours, and a failed attempt at getting help from a preacher (he refused to assist), the exorcism finally concludes in dramatic fashion:

It appeared as if we were observing a tremendous battle between the Susan we knew and loved and some strange evil force. But the momentum had shifted and we now sensed that victory was at hand.
While Alice and Louise held Susan, her sister continued holding the Bible to her face. Almost taunting the evil spirit that had almost beaten us minutes before, the students dared Susan to read biblical passages. She choked on certain passages and could not finish the sentence "Jesus is Lord." Over and over, she repeated "Jesus is L..L..LL," often ending in profanities. In between her futile attempts, Susan pleaded with us to continue trying and often smiled between the grimaces that accompanied her readings of Scripture. Just as suddenly as she went into the trance, Susan suddenly reappeared and claimed "Jesus is Lord."

With an almost comical smile, Susan then looked up as if awakening from a deep sleep and asked, "Has something happened?" She did not remember any of the past few hours and was startled to find her friends breaking out in cheers and laughter, overwhelmed by sudden joy and relief."

So, Yeah.

I Travel for JOOLS said...

Do you have a link to where I can see about purchasing that article Jindahl wrote? I've googled a bit and can't find it. Thanks.

Nick said...

@ JOOLS -

Link for Jindal reference is here.

Stacey K said...

Thanks for the stuff about Jindal. When my family lived in Louisiana it was the Governor Edwards era. In my wildest imagination I NEVER thought that state would elect anyone not of the redneck persuasion. Honestly the whole demon, exorcist thing really makes sense for a Louisiana Gov - to me at least. You've gotta be kinda out there to want the job and even more out there to make them want to elect you.

dangerousdaisy said...

Sounds like Sarah Palin reenacting "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil" with Rush as the unnamed demon.

:)

This is soooooooooo going to lead into a pollitical/religious rant...but later....

I didn't say I was voting for Jindal or hoping he's the GOP nominee in '12, but on the GOP end of it, they've seemingly realigned themselves with Jindal doing the response for them. Jindal certainly isn't the GOP geriatric, white-haired, white male of the usual sort.

And if Jindal gets a strong website going then we'll KNOW the libs having infilterated their camps and it's all a dream.

SmedRock said...

That is some funny words Xo. Thanks for the link Nick.

I Travel for JOOLS said...

Thanks, Nick.

Andrew said...

I'm glad you are optimistic, hip guy.

Too bad the stock market and the real players aren't.

By the way, you can suck dicks if you want, but I prefer tits.